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DAVID FRIERMAN

A practical dictionary of Chinese medicine by Nigel Wiseman, Feng Ye.

From the simple and common to the complex and rare, this book contains subtleties, distinctions and nuances of Chinese medicine never found in beginners' texts. Whether for translational or clinical application, it presents the concepts of Chinese medicine exactly as they would come to the mind of a Chinese physician speaking or writing in their native language./p>

Arranged as a classical dictionary, definitions are provided in English alphabetic order, and include the English term, the source Chinese term, its Pinyin transliteration (including spoken tone), pronounciation, etymology, and one or more definitions as applied in Chinese medicine. Terms used within definitions are cross-referenced and disease and symptom descriptions include the standard therapies applied in the People's Republic of China. Each definition is referenced to one or more Chinese source. In all, it lists the characters, Pinyin, translations, and definitions for more than 10,000 medical concepts, including treatments for the patterns catalogued, 2,000 formulas, 1,700 natural drugs, and 1,500 acupoints.


Classified dictionary of Traditional Chinese Medicine

This dictionary is compiled on the basis of a research project on the standardization of English translation of Chinese medical terminology, sponsored by the State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine. It includes 7010 entries among which, 6630 are traditional Chinese medical terms and 380 are commonly used citations and maxims. Listed in the order of traditional Chinese medical textbooks, it is both a precise and practical dictionary and a minitype encyclopedical works of traditional Chinese medicine. There are four indexes at the end of the book to facilitate consultation.

 

 

 


Fundamentals of Chinese medicine = Zhong yi xue ji chu translated and amended by Nigel Wiseman.

English translations of traditional Chinese medical texts rarely have conformed to the standards required of a contribution to sinology. One exception has been the first edition of Fundamentals of Chinese Medicine, a ground-breaking translation of the Zhong Yi Ji Chu Xue which demonstrated that not only was it possible to meet scholarly expectations for the translations of TCM, but that the cooperation of living Chinese speaking clinicians could reveal nuances of practice. Beyond beginner's manuals, it gives English-speaking students of TCM a chance to appreciate the qualitative details available to their Chinese-speaking colleagues. It offers readers the rare opportunity to understand Chinese medicine, not as it is perceived by a Western writer, but as it is perceived and taught in China, because Chinese descriptions of TCM that confound Western expectations have not been expunged from the textual translation.